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Magpie   

That's my favorite, too, MrsG. I have a beat-up old paperback copy from thirty or so years ago. I looked into buying a new one, but the recipes aren't the same.

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Daisylou   

I have all of these great cook books by all the "important" chefs but the book I use most often for basics??....Betty Crocker!!

I also find most recipes that I need online yet I love cookbooks and looking at cookbooks. It's food porn!

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This recipe is courtesy of Paula Deen from the Food Network and it is super easy.

 

 

Ultimate Coffee Cake

16 to 18 unbaked frozen dinner rolls

1 (3-ounce) package regular butterscotch pudding mix, not instant

1/2 cup brown sugar, packed

1/2 cup pecans, chopped

1 stick (1/2 cup) butter, melted

The night before place frozen rolls in well greased Bundt pan. Sprinkle dry pudding mix over rolls. Sprinkle brown sugar over pudding mix. Sprinkle chopped pecans over brown sugar. Pour melted butter over all. To prevent the dough from forming a hard crust while its rising overnight, cover with a damp towel or tightly wrap with plastic wrap. Let rise overnight at room temperature, about 8 to 10 hours.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Bake in oven for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and allow to cool for 5 minutes. Turn pan over onto a serving platter to remove. Serve by pulling apart chunks with forks.

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Minxy   

Mmmmmmmmm....made the biscuits and gravy from that Pioneer Woman's blog last night. Crazy easy and holy freakin' good!! I could feel my arteries hardening with each mouthful but whatever. It was too good to care!

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Tsylyst   
I'm just addicted to myrecipes.com.

 

I'm that way with AllRecipes.com. I love cookbooks, though. I own a few dozen, but I also borrow them from the library and make copies at home.

 

One of my favorites is "Death Warmed Over," which explores the food connected to funeral customs around the world.

 

My overall favorite though is the book my 80-year-old grandmother put together for me after years of begging. It has all the family recipes in it, and some tips and tricks from her kitchen. A family cookbook like that is a GREAT idea for a holiday present.

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I highly recommend Alton Brown's Potstickers. Sometimes I just do them as steamed dumplings instead of potstickers and I lurve them.

 

 

My favorite brownie recipe:

 

 

One Bowl Brownies

4 squares BAKER'S Unsweetened Baking Chocolate

3/4 cup (1-1/2 sticks) butter or margarine

2 cups sugar

3 eggs

1 tsp. vanilla

1 cup flour

1 cup coarsely chopped PLANTERS Pecans

 

PREHEAT oven to 350°F. Line 13x9-inch baking pan with foil, with ends of foil extending over sides of pan. Grease foil.

MICROWAVE chocolate and butter in large microwaveable bowl on HIGH 2 min. or until butter is melted. Stir until chocolate is completely melted. Stir in sugar. Blend in eggs and vanilla. Add flour and pecans; mix well. Spread into prepared pan.

BAKE 30 to 35 min. or until toothpick inserted in center comes out with fudgy crumbs. (Do not overbake.) Cool in pan on wire rack. Remove brownies from pan, using foil handles. Cut into 24 squares. Store in tightly covered container at room temperature.

Edited by GenieinTx

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Some of my favorites:

 

Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child, Simone Beck, and Louisette Bertholle

 

An amazing work made all the more so by the complete lack of pretention in Mrs. Child's presentation. A whole generation (or two, now) think of Mrs. Child as a comic figure but Mastering the Art of French Cooking was and is a seminal work that isn't only about recipes but is also about cooking techniques - virtually all of which have french origins.

 

Cookwise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Cooking by Shirley Corriher

 

Another fantastic work which includes recipes but is squarely focused on the science of cooking and cooking techniques. After reading this book, you'll understand why recipes are constructed the way they are, what purposes certain ingredients perform, and just why the hell that last dish came out so damn bad.

 

I'm Just Here for the Food: Food + Heat = Cooking by Alton Brown

I'm Just Here for More Food: Food x Mixing + Heat = Baking by Alton Brown

 

The host of the Food Networks Good Eats has written two fun books that have the same feel of Mr. Wizard meeting MST3K in the kitchen to cook up some treats. The baking book, in particular, is very nice for it's analysis on baking techniques, recipes, and light-hearted science.

 

Anything from Cook's Illustrated but particularly Cook's "Best Recipe" line

 

Cook's Illustrated is a tremendous no-nonsense culinary magazine who's approach to recipes and preperation is to experiment, experiment, and experiment until the best possible recipe and technique combination can be indentified. They are exhaustive in their approach so you don't have to be and the results are almost invariably smashing successes. Not as pretentious as Bon Apetit but much more thourghly researched, described, and presented to the reader - anything from this outfit would serve as a strong recipe collection centerpiece

 

Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain

 

Not a recipe or technique book. In fact, not a cookbook at all. It's simply the greatest insider's account of working at top end restaurants that has ever been published. Bourdain is a cook's cook - not your typical celebrichef - and his insights and knowledge are opinionated, gossipy, entertaining, and non-equivocal. On top of all of that, Bourdain is one of the best writers (in the sense of literary techique) you will ever have the pleasure of reading. Once you read Kitchen Confidential, you'll be hooked and will be reading everything he has and is writing as well as watching any of his TV shows.

Edited by zgeist_returns

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Daisylou   

All good books! We have some of the same ones. I also love Julia's, The Way to Cook.

 

Has anyone purchased a Giada DeLaurentiis book? I used to hate her show but it has slowly grown on me and her cookbooks look so good.

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tooletta   

Yep~ Those are some great brownies, Genie. I used to manage a Bed and Breakfast and those were one of my staple recipes, (NO nuts, though!). People loved them.

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Tsylyst   

I'd purchase a piece of dog shit if Giada DeLaurentiis told me to. Woman is F-I-N-E.

 

I borrowed a book of hers from a friend a while back. It had some great-looking stuff in it, but I've never made anything out of it. The friend has, though, and has said that the food is fantastic.

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Tsylyst   

I know there are a ton of tricks out there that people use in their kitchens every day.

 

Here's one that I used all the time. I buy shloads of sugar, but rarely do I buy brown sugar. I use it so little that even those terra cotta softener thingies don't keep it from hardening up. Plus, it takes up valuable real estate in my apartment's limited cupboard space. So, here's a trick I found online about making my own brown sugar when it's called for:

 

For each 1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar called for in a recipe, use 1 1/2 tablespoons molasses plus 1 cup granulated sugar.

 

To make light brown sugar from dark brown sugar, use 1/2 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar and 1/2 cup granulated sugar.

 

For dark brown sugar, use 1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar plus 1 tablespoon molasses; or 1 cup granulated sugar plus 1/4 cup molasses.

Credit:
CDKitchen.com

 

I always have molasses on hand for gingerbread cake (flove!) and marinades, so I can conserve space in my kitchen.

 

Share your favorite tips and tricks here.

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Tsylyst   

I'm making these brownies right now. They're in the oven and they smell G-O-O-D.

 

The recipe is a little wack, though. I ended up melting the butter in the microwave and doing the mixing in a stand mixer (I flove my KitchenAid). Even with tempering the eggs, the heat of the pan made scrambled eggs when I tried to do it the way the recipe called for. I threw it out and started over.

 

ETA: OMOGG, those brownies are fantastic!

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